Early Music

Early-Music Seminars Egida Sartori e Laura Alvini Cantar Distanti

❗️ CANCELLED ❗️ The Egida Sartori and Laura Alvini Early Music Seminars Barbara Strozzi (1619-1677). Music and Culture in 17th-Century Venice

 Antonio Caldara in Venice and at Vignanello

The Egida Sartori and Laura Alvini Early Music Seminars

Early Music Seminars. Opera and Slavery in the French Caribbean (1760-90)

Jan Dismas Zelenka. Masses and sonatas 1720-30

The Egida Sartori and Laura Alvini Early Music Seminars Roman de Fauvel. Music and Corruption in the Paris of Philip the Fair. 1300-1315

Conclusive Concert of the Early Music Seminars 2017

Conclusive Concert of the Early Music Seminars 2016

Janequin and Carpentras. Tradition and Innovation in 16th-century France

Early Music Concert. Lachrymae from Ferrara and Venice.

Concert: Matteo da Perugia. Music in Gothic Milan

Early Music Seminars Egida Sartori and Laura Alvini. Matteo da Perugia Music in Gothic Milan (1390-1425)

The Egida Sartori and Laura Alvini Early Music Seminars Alessandro Stradella 1639-1682. Seven cantatas rediscovered in Fondazione Giorgio Cini archives

Concert More Hispano.Tomás Luis de Victoria in Rome and Madrid

Tomás Luis de Victoria in Rome and Madrid

The Early Music Seminars were launched in 1976 by Egida Sartori, a celebrated harpsichordist and teacher at the conservatories in Rome, Venice, and Milan. In these summer seminars Egida Sartori offered not only young harpsichord players but also musicians of other instruments the chance to perfect performing techniques and interpretation by studying with illustrious Italian and foreign masters.
Since May 2007, the seminars have been directed by Pedro Memelsdorff, an internationally renowned musician and conductor, who was invited to direct the seminars after the death of Laura Alvini in January 2005. Memelsdorff aims to continue the historically documented approach to early music, focusing particularly on previously little explored issues of musical propaedeutics. The seminars will be enhanced by two new developments: the extension of the repertoire to include the Middle Ages (previously only the period from 16th to the 19th century was considered); and international musicology studies days to be held at the same time as the seminars.